Chromebook Users of Rio Rancho

I live in Rio Rancho, New Mexico and my kids attend the Rio Rancho Public Schools District.  One of the changes that have happened over the last couple of years in the district is the adoption of the Google Education infrastructure and the use of Chrombooks throughout all the schools.  I’ve seen investment in classrooms where teachers now have over 30 chromebooks to use for classroom instruction.

With these changes, what I have not seen is any general education for the students, siblings, or parents in the community (and surrounding tribal communities).  I decided to try and change that with the free resources available through the City of Rio Rancho.

I am a volunteer with the city and this enabled me to teach my Raspberry Pi classes in 2017 at the Loma Colorado Public Library.  This library has great resources … rooms, tables, chairs, laptops, monitors, keyboards, mice, and great internet bandwith!  So all I really needed to do was schedule and coordinate to get this new set of classes started.

One of the challenges in starting anything new is awareness, so I decided to use the Meetup.com to raise awareness initially, then moved on to a email list.  The email list page is at:

https://groups.io/g/cuorr

We had our first class/meetup on July 27, 2019 at the Loma Colorado Public Library Auditorium, I brought 12 Chromebooks for folks to use … we had 11 people attend, some hands on time, and many questions around the Chromebook and Google services.  I was excited about the attendance and am looking at holding this class once a month for now and maybe more frequent based on interest and demand.

I will be scheduling new meetups or classes via meetup.com so, keep an eye on this website for new events or check out to the library calendar.

– Dom

GnuCash Accounting Software on the Raspberry Pi

I’ve recently had the need to use some Accounting software to dive into some Revenue and Expense allocation for a company to understand the business better.  There was the hurdle of downloading and buying Quickbooks desktop version or buying a online version instance for a month maybe more, and I didn’t know the Quickbooks user interface.

At one time, many years ago, looked at GnuCash and thought it had potential but never spent the time.  Now that I had the need and revisited GnuCash, much to my surprise, the open source software had improved and I decided to take the plunge and learn it.

I do have an accounting class under my belt from graduate school, so the whole double entry accounting was not new to me, and I was glad to see how the concept of accounts was implemented in GnuCash.  Long story short, I was able to enter about 10 months of bank account data into GnuCash, then allocate expenses to get a quick picture of where 2 major projects were with respect to their direct costs and indirect costs.

I’m thankful that GnuCash was an option and it took me several hours to get the answers I was looking for about this business.  If I used Quickbooks, it likely would have taken me longer and had a cost to it.

Here are a couple screenshots of the GnuCash application, It’s easy to use and free on Linux, Windows, and Max OSX.  I tried the version on Windows also, the data file (FILENAME.gnucash) can be copied/moved and used on Linux too, I tested editing on both instances of the GnuCash data file.

To install GnuCash on your Raspberry Pi, simply run the following commands from a command line:

  • sudo apt-get update
  • sudo apt-get install gnucash

When GnuCash is installed a new icon will appear under the Office grouping.  The version that was installed was GnuCash 2.6.4, and I copied this icon to the desktop for frequent use.

rpi3gnucashmenu

rpi3gnucashsplashscreen

rpi3gnucashgui

Muhammad Ali memorial, my grandfather Homer Yahnozha, and the words of Chief Oren Lyons

Muhammed Ali Memorial

I was in a Houston airport yesterday waiting for my next plane back to New Mexico after teaching a workshop in New York City and I caught the memorial service live broadcast on the local TV in the airport.

One of my vivid childhood memories of my grandfather Homer Yahnozha (Mescalero Apache) was that he very much loved to watch Boxing when it came on the TV in his house in Paguate, New Mexico.  Homer was a survivor of the Bataan Death March and from my perspective (as a child) he was unemotional most of the time I interacted with him, a likely result from his experiences in military combat, survival, and service for this country.  Boxing was one of the few times I saw his face light up in joy while two boxers went at one another.  I’m sure he watched Muhammad Ali a time or two and would have been sad at his passing.

It was heartwarming to see that Muhammad Ali had planned to have a Native American speak at his memorial, one in his Native Language of the Onondaga and the other in English.

The two individuals that spoke were Chief Sydney Hill and Chief Oren Lyons, in attendance on stage was Ernie Stevens, Jr.

I’d like to capture what was spoken by Chief Lyons here because of it’s meaning and that Muhammad Ali had the foresight to provide yet another global and world platform for the Native American community and Indigenous peoples.  I have yet to see a full transcript of what was said at the memorial.

I transcribed the words of Chief Oren Lyons here based on the video below:

“Translation (of the words Chief Sydney Hill just before) … He said, my relatives, it is my responsibility to pick up the words for the (native word of his community) the people of the longhouse, they wish you well, they want you to be at peace of mind.  

Now this great darkness that has happened to us, you must understand, that he who had gathered us here, that his road is straight, peacefully he will arrive at his land (native words) our creator.  

It is the same as you call him Allah, these were the words.  

To the family, relatives, and friends, of Muhammad Ali … Muhammad Ali was a leader among men, and a champion of the people.  He fought for the people of color, yet he was a man of peace and principles.  A man of compassion who used his great gifts for the common good.  

His spirit has a clear path to the creator.  (Native words) Sydney Hill, spiritual leader of the (native words) 6 Nation Iroquois Confederation Onondaga Nation, and myself (native name), faith-keeper, turtle clan, Onondaga Council Of Chiefs, have journeyed here today to add our voice to this congregation of world leaders, in honor of his work, and for the rights and dignity of people of color and the common man.  

He (Muhammad Ali) was always in support of the indigenous people of this hemisphere in our quest for our inherent land rights, self determination, identity, and collective rights that include the natural world.  

We know … we know what he was up against, because we’ve had 524 years of survival training ourselves.

In 1978 a congressman from the state of Washington put a bill into congress to terminate our treaties with the United States, and Indian Nations walked from California to Washington DC in protest.  Muhammad Ali marched into Washington DC with us.

He was a free independent spirit, he stood his ground with great courage and conviction, and he paid a price, and this country did too, we all did.  

Values and principles will determine one’s destiny and the principles of a nation will do the same.

Poor people do not have many options, you fighters know what I’m talking about.

He said that the ring was Ali’s path to destiny.  He said he’d be heavyweight champion of the world, and he was, 3 times, and this 4th time, right here right now.

On his journey in life, he lived and learned the hard way, he brought a life into this world, my world, our world, and that life will shine a long long time.

Peace brother, peace, and on behalf of the (native words referencing his community) my friend Ernie, and the indigenous people everywhere, peace, thank you, (native words of thanks).”

 

Here is the YouTube video this was based on:  https://youtu.be/CdLzviYQh70