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GnuCash Accounting Software on the Raspberry Pi

October 22, 2016 Leave a comment

I’ve recently had the need to use some Accounting software to dive into some Revenue and Expense allocation for a company to understand the business better.  There was the hurdle of downloading and buying Quickbooks desktop version or buying a online version instance for a month maybe more, and I didn’t know the Quickbooks user interface.

At one time, many years ago, looked at GnuCash and thought it had potential but never spent the time.  Now that I had the need and revisited GnuCash, much to my surprise, the open source software had improved and I decided to take the plunge and learn it.

I do have an accounting class under my belt from graduate school, so the whole double entry accounting was not new to me, and I was glad to see how the concept of accounts was implemented in GnuCash.  Long story short, I was able to enter about 10 months of bank account data into GnuCash, then allocate expenses to get a quick picture of where 2 major projects were with respect to their direct costs and indirect costs.

I’m thankful that GnuCash was an option and it took me several hours to get the answers I was looking for about this business.  If I used Quickbooks, it likely would have taken me longer and had a cost to it.

Here are a couple screenshots of the GnuCash application, It’s easy to use and free on Linux, Windows, and Max OSX.  I tried the version on Windows also, the data file (FILENAME.gnucash) can be copied/moved and used on Linux too, I tested editing on both instances of the GnuCash data file.

To install GnuCash on your Raspberry Pi, simply run the following commands from a command line:

  • sudo apt-get update
  • sudo apt-get install gnucash

When GnuCash is installed a new icon will appear under the Office grouping.  The version that was installed was GnuCash 2.6.4, and I copied this icon to the desktop for frequent use.

rpi3gnucashmenu

rpi3gnucashsplashscreen

rpi3gnucashgui

Apalachicola Bay Oysters in Tampa, FL

June 15, 2016 Leave a comment

While in Tampa, FL try the Apalachicola Bay warm-water Oysters
(if you can find them), very different than any I’ve tried up to now.

Muhammad Ali memorial, my grandfather Homer Yahnozha, and the words of Chief Oren Lyons

June 11, 2016 Leave a comment

Muhammed Ali Memorial

I was in a Houston airport yesterday waiting for my next plane back to New Mexico after teaching a workshop in New York City and I caught the memorial service live broadcast on the local TV in the airport.

One of my vivid childhood memories of my grandfather Homer Yahnozha (Mescalero Apache) was that he very much loved to watch Boxing when it came on the TV in his house in Paguate, New Mexico.  Homer was a survivor of the Bataan Death March and from my perspective (as a child) he was unemotional most of the time I interacted with him, a likely result from his experiences in military combat, survival, and service for this country.  Boxing was one of the few times I saw his face light up in joy while two boxers went at one another.  I’m sure he watched Muhammad Ali a time or two and would have been sad at his passing.

It was heartwarming to see that Muhammad Ali had planned to have a Native American speak at his memorial, one in his Native Language of the Onondaga and the other in English.

The two individuals that spoke were Chief Sydney Hill and Chief Oren Lyons, in attendance on stage was Ernie Stevens, Jr.

I’d like to capture what was spoken by Chief Lyons here because of it’s meaning and that Muhammad Ali had the foresight to provide yet another global and world platform for the Native American community and Indigenous peoples.  I have yet to see a full transcript of what was said at the memorial.

I transcribed the words of Chief Oren Lyons here based on the video below:

“Translation (of the words Chief Sydney Hill just before) … He said, my relatives, it is my responsibility to pick up the words for the (native word of his community) the people of the longhouse, they wish you well, they want you to be at peace of mind.  

Now this great darkness that has happened to us, you must understand, that he who had gathered us here, that his road is straight, peacefully he will arrive at his land (native words) our creator.  

It is the same as you call him Allah, these were the words.  

To the family, relatives, and friends, of Muhammad Ali … Muhammad Ali was a leader among men, and a champion of the people.  He fought for the people of color, yet he was a man of peace and principles.  A man of compassion who used his great gifts for the common good.  

His spirit has a clear path to the creator.  (Native words) Sydney Hill, spiritual leader of the (native words) 6 Nation Iroquois Confederation Onondaga Nation, and myself (native name), faith-keeper, turtle clan, Onondaga Council Of Chiefs, have journeyed here today to add our voice to this congregation of world leaders, in honor of his work, and for the rights and dignity of people of color and the common man.  

He (Muhammad Ali) was always in support of the indigenous people of this hemisphere in our quest for our inherent land rights, self determination, identity, and collective rights that include the natural world.  

We know … we know what he was up against, because we’ve had 524 years of survival training ourselves.

In 1978 a congressman from the state of Washington put a bill into congress to terminate our treaties with the United States, and Indian Nations walked from California to Washington DC in protest.  Muhammad Ali marched into Washington DC with us.

He was a free independent spirit, he stood his ground with great courage and conviction, and he paid a price, and this country did too, we all did.  

Values and principles will determine one’s destiny and the principles of a nation will do the same.

Poor people do not have many options, you fighters know what I’m talking about.

He said that the ring was Ali’s path to destiny.  He said he’d be heavyweight champion of the world, and he was, 3 times, and this 4th time, right here right now.

On his journey in life, he lived and learned the hard way, he brought a life into this world, my world, our world, and that life will shine a long long time.

Peace brother, peace, and on behalf of the (native words referencing his community) my friend Ernie, and the indigenous people everywhere, peace, thank you, (native words of thanks).”

 

Here is the YouTube video this was based on:  https://youtu.be/CdLzviYQh70

Oysters in Albuquerque, New Mexico

April 24, 2016 Leave a comment

I grew up outside Albuquerque and I love seafood especially Oysters.  I had heard Nantucket Shoals Seafood Market carried oysters but found out last year it was going to close.  After a visit several months ago a new owner came forward to continue seafood market.  Since then it has become my place to stop when I wanted a oyster to shuck myself.  I have enjoyed a variety of different oysters up to now and hope to try many more in the future.  Here is a sampling of what I tried:

Sol  Azul, Calm Cove, Shigoku Oysters

Sol Azul, Calm Cove, & Shigoku Oysters

Sol Azul Oysters (left) from Baja Mexico, Calm Cove Oysters from Washington (upper right), and Shigoku Oysters from Washington (lower right).

Shigoku Oyster

Shigoku Oyster


Calm Cove Oyster

Calm Cove Oyster

.

Blue Point, Netarts Bay, & Willapa Bay Oysters

Blue Point, Netarts Bay, & Willapa Bay Oysters

Blue Point Oysters from New York (left), Netarts Bay Oysters from Oregon (middle), and Willapa Bay Oysters from Washington (right).

Netarts Bay Oyster

Netarts Bay Oyster

Lessons Learned serving as a Laguna Development Corporation (LDC) Board of Directors Member

October 31, 2014 Leave a comment

It’s no secret that I’m on the Board of Directors of Laguna Development Corporation (it’s in my Bio here and on the company website, so it’s public).  I was appointed about 3 years ago this month by the Pueblo of Laguna tribal council based on my corporate experience and being a pueblo of laguna tribal member.  Since being appointed, I have seen and experienced quite a bit in the areas of gaming, hospitality, retail, and food & beverage.  Here are some lessons learned during this journey, in no particular order.  I will add to this list as more lessons come to mind.

  1. A Section 17 federal tribal corporation is a unique corporate entity, it is tribal community oriented.
  2. Non-tribal board members will likely struggle to understand the tribal perspective and way of life.
  3. Being an active and contributing board member will take more time than you think, more than 75% of my IBM vacation time off work went to being a board member.
  4. Corporate communication is hard to do well.
  5. Understanding sovereign immunity is fundamental and important.
  6. When $777,632 went missing in late 2014, it was a big deal.  Based on the cash share agreement this means the pueblo is out more than $500,000 for 2015.
  7. Tribal businesses seem to lack a “killer instinct” to dominate their market and be number one, they move forward very conservatively.
  8. Disappointment is part of having high standards of behavior and ethics.

Update … on January 31, 2015, my term expired and I am no longer on the Laguna Development Corporation Board Of Directors, long story.  I am grateful Laguna Pueblo gave me the opportunity to contribute back to my home community in the capacities I can.  I’m open and look forward to helping other tribes raise the bar and really compete in the business world off the rez.

– Dom

New Veggie Market in Bernalillo

March 13, 2011 2 comments

Since we live in north Rio Rancho, anytime we go to Albuquerque we end up driving through Bernalillo on highway 550.

Half way between I-25 and the Rio Grande River there is a new vegetable market on the north side of the road.  Some local entrepreneur converted a old liquor store into a fresh veggie stand that caters to the local hispanic market.

One day, we decided to stop by and take a quick look at the new market.  I was surprised to find many fresh produce items, as well as, dried items that the local pueblo indians would find useful, like dried corn, corn husks, and melons.

Anyway, I’m glad to see things like this popping up locally.

– Dom

MDK Barber Shop – Rio Rancho, New Mexico

December 18, 2010 Leave a comment

When I moved to the Albuquerque area, one of the things I was looking for was a barber shop for myself and my boys.  It took several barber shops and a while to find a place I liked.

I lived on the east side of Tucson for 10 years and was spoiled with the Two Sons Barber Shop.  This family business was awesome, they cut great hair and it was a place to catch up with what’s going on locally in Tucson, especially Wildcat Basketball.  It was also a place to meet people and connect with others who did business in the area.

My 2 boys and I have been going to MDK Barber Shop in Rio Rancho now for several months.  It’s much like the shop in Tucson, family owned, great hair cuts, and lively atmosphere.  I’m sure over time I’ll see much of the same as I did in Tucson.

– Dom

*UPDATE* Since I wrote this post, MDK barbershop has created a website … www.mdkbarbershop.com

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